wearable Tag

19 Sep The Wearable Smartphone: The future of smartphones and wearable devices

If recent history is any indication for what the smartphone will look and be like in the near future, then we can expect radical changes and dramatically different ways that we will interface with this technology. Today wearables are mostly smartphone companion devices that connect with Bluetooth. That invisible cord will probably be cut soon. New products are constantly emerging that continue to revolutionize the smartwatch, smartphone, and wearable computing industry. In fact, in January 2016, Apple announced it is doing away with wired headphones jack altogether and going with Bluetooth earbuds. Soon enough you will have a smartphone on your wrist with independent cellular connectivity: the wearable smartphone. This will be your health and fitness monitor, media player, 3D mouse and controller, and biometric key and wallet. You will be able to make a call, effortlessly lock and unlock doors, avoid security lines and make payments instantly and securely all from your wrist. Wearable projection interfacing (mapping a display onto any surface) and heads-up displays (smartphone glasses that enable us to augment our reality and senses) allow your hands and fingers to be your touchscreen display eliminating the need to carry a pocket PC. Ben Arnold, Executive Director, Industry Analyst, Consumer Electronics, The NPD Group, said “Manufacturers continue to partner with designers to increase the appeal of the products, and there is a product for every type of consumer—from the most active athlete to the mom who just wants to remember when to pick up her kids from soccer practice—on the market.”[1] eyeCam is developing eyeHand a wearable smartphone with a projection interface that turns your hand and fingers into a touchscreen display, 3D mouse, and controller. If this is what the future looks like, what will it look like in 5 or 10 years? We can’t wait to see. [1] https://www.npd.com/wps/portal/npd/us/news/press-releases/2015/ownership-of-activity-trackers-smartwatches-expected-to-jump-at-least-4-percent-this-holiday-season-according-to-npd/  ...

Read More

16 Aug The Evolution of Wearables: From Pedometers to Smartwatches and Beyond

Legend has it that Thomas Jefferson invented the first pedometer, but in truth, Leonardo Da Vinci envisioned the pedometer as a tool for the military. Using the pedometer as a tool for fitness and weight control was introduced in the 1960’s in Japan.  Finnish inventor, Professor Seppo Säynäjäkangas, came up with the first portable heart rate monitor in a watch format in the 1970’s. Fast forward to the 21st Century: The Fitbit was introduced in 2008 at TechCrunch50 to much acclaim.  The first product tracked the intensity of activity, calories burned, distance travelled, the number of steps taken, and sleep patterns. Eight years later, eyeHand has developed the technology for a full body mapping system that enables athletes to map their body motion and improve their game in real-time. Operating as a sensor hub, eyeHand networks with micro-sensors worn, attached, or embedded in clothing or sporting equipment to generate a 3D map of your body for full body motion capture throughout a game or training session. Imagine the incredible new opportunities for live-action sports and gaming (live indoor/outdoor video gaming with athletes and friends on the field, the court or on the move).  eyeHand technology can let you play with a professional athlete remotely from your living room or stream your power serve on the tennis court to your friend’s game console, in real-time. All of this is possible today thanks to the amazing advancements in sensor technologies and the dramatic acceptance and adoption of wearable devices. TechNavio, a research and advisory firm, announced they expect the global demand for sensors for mobile devices to reach over $52B in revenue by 2020. According to the global information provider, The NPD Group, annual 2015 dollar and unit sales of connected activity trackers experienced respective growth of 110 percent and 85 percent versus 2014, despite the average selling price (ASP) increasing from $96 to $109. “Despite slightly lower overall awareness of the fitness tracker category, fitness trackers are still showing strong sales and ownership, which shows that the category still has more headroom for growth, while strong awareness has not yet translated into more robust sales for smartwatches,” said Weston Henderek, Director of NPD Connected Intelligence. We see tremendous opportunity for OEMs. With eyeCam’s reference design kits, they can license, acquire and rapidly introduce groundbreaking new sports and fitness products to market, secure a faster ROI, and have the ability to add features/services in the future that drive and maximize ongoing revenue....

Read More